• 3.27.15

    Serge Seidlitz and Andrew Rae Show the World Through a Child's Eyes

    Imagine if we all saw the world as children do. Endless potential and opportunity, each path ahead of us an avenue of imagination. The shapes of clouds turning into medieval battles, and the whispers of rivers our favorite new songs. Each moment is unlockable, revealing a new game, a new way to play, and a new way to see our world. The voices of children, no matter how loud while at play, are piteously silent when considered by very important adults with very important adult lives with very important adult decisions. London's Museum of Childhood asks its attendees to explore the value of a child’s eyes, offering the challenge to shrug off our man made apparatuses that mercilessly eat up our days. Inside the museum are exhibits, events, and activities that remind attendees of their own childhoods, and teach about the childhoods of people worlds a way. But the lesson doesn’t need to stay within those four London walls.

    As a part of an environmental campaign, the museum teamed up with more than a dozen artists to create art out of the natural and pedestrian landmarks around London. Each artist created original work that played off native points of interest: a door's natural wear turns into an interested ostrich with the addition of an illustrated face. A crosswalk becomes the gaping mouth of a curious bird.

    For those of us that aren't around London right now, photographer Lydia Whitmore plays as our eyes. Hunting each native piece through the streets of London, Lydia fits each and everyone into her viewfinder so that we may see London in some different way. You can experience Lydia’s journey through London using the “See the World” micro site that includes Lydia’s photographs and the locations of each piece.

    Andrew Rae and Serge Seidlitz were a part of the creative roster to eke out the imagination of London's populace. Each environmental piece of art featured the Museum of Childhood’s bold encouragement to “See the world through a child’s eyes.”

    Serge Seidlitz’s “Ostrich” face, tail, and long legs are carefully arranged around the shipped paint of a fire exit on Brady Street. Splashes of paint on the wall of a self-storage facility on Sidney Street become the torrents from a thunder cloud, Serge’s creation “Cloud.”

    In Andrew Rae’s “Bird” two markings that had been painted on a crosswalk at Shipton Street and Columbia Road were repurposed as the beak of a large blue, aggressive bird. 

    Following Lydia's path through the map provided to us by the museum, we're able to use Serge and Andrew's imagination to see London with all the imaginative details that a child would bring to their vision, and that new sight changes the way we see the city. Now the question remains: how does it change your own vision?

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