• 2.19.16

    Jonas Fredwall Karlsson Makes Reality Possible for Sub-Zero

    When Jonas Fredwall Karlsson got the call to shoot Sub-Zero’s latest campaign, he knew that there was going to be a challenge right off the bat. The idea was to show families in the building stages of their homes who have already chosen Sub-Zero appliances from the very beginning. Like any shoot, they had limitations. “Of course, these days, time is limited and we had to be as smart as possible,” Jonas explains. He knew that they probably weren’t going to find the perfect construction locations that would also stop work for weeks just to get a shoot in, so Jonas decided to think outside the box. Or, outside the construction zone, as it were.

    Instead of trying to find the perfect construction site they decided to build it. “We created a platform, like a concert stage, and then we built the beams and the whole construction on top of that,” he says. By creating an actual construction zone they were able to place the location wherever they wanted, positioning everything perfectly for light and time, maximizing efficiency and ensuring a product that was malleable to their needs. “We could have any background we wanted, we could put it in a location where there’s good morning light and then move to a location where it’s good evening light because the only thing we will see will be the construction site.” So that’s what they did. They took their whole construction zone with them in order to create the perfect look. Using this one major fix, everything else was able to happen naturally. And that's the whole point.

    Jonas is proud, and rightly so, that all of the backgrounds in this campaign are totally natural to the locations where they shot. The Empire State Building can really be seen through that apartment's window, the family of ducks are really swimming by on the pond. Even the small dog visiting the young couple in the mountains was a serendipitous moment: the pup was a crewmember’s pet that wandered on set. “To me, even when you do advertising, the more real you can be the better,” Jonas explains. Even when you have the unlimited options of digital manipulation, it’s still best to keep everything as true to life as possible. “You can do so much these days. You can put anything together. But the trick is to make things look real,” he says. The audience can always tell when something is real, even if it’s a subconscious recognition, and Jonas wants to take advantage of that in his work. “If you’re lucky you’re able to capture that and it adds to the realism of the picture. It sells the story, which is nice for everybody.”

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