• 2.7.17

    Bose Collins Keeps It Clean with Dove

    It’s easy to forget everything that goes into a bottle of body wash when you’re getting to lather up in the shower. It’s not just creams and soap, but essential oils, scents, and most crucially the science that goes into balancing how these products will interact with your own body chemistry. It’s not enough to get you clean, but brands like Dove want to make sure that they’re contributing to your overall health as well as your hygiene. It’s a complex task that ultimately results in a bottled gel of cream. The question is how to communicate that. Just recently Dove invited Bose Collins to help them show off the variety of ingredients, textures, and even rhythms that go into Dove products. 

    Bose Collins created the short video as a part of a pop-up store that Dove hosted in Paris in October, but the video is as alive today as it was in the Fall for displaying the variety of sources and moods that go into each Dove product. Whether it’s slow motion body bars dropping into vats of moisturizer, video of colored oils interacting with each other and water putting unique movement and textures on display, or bringing in the botanicals and fruit that offer their essential oils and essences to make Dove products unique, each small part of the video sets a tone of cleanliness, healthfulness, and refreshment.

    We know that videos cannot be scratch and sniff, and we know that you can’t bathe in this one, but Bose Collins makes us ache for that experience which means they must have done something right.

  • 7.28.16

    National Geographic's Ossified Menagerie by Bose Collins

    DNA is literally the building blocks of life. As far as we’ve seen, every living organism on this planet has the double helix of DNA hiding away in its cells, and amazingly most of our DNA is all the same. There is such an abundance of information, and information at that scales means that everything on the planet is more similar than we might seem. For instance, Human beings share 50% of our DNA with bananas. DNA is integral to the planet Earth, and that’s something that National Geographic wanted to feature in their latest cover story, but to visualize it effectively they asked Bose Collins to help them make it possible.

    In their CGI illustrated cover, the creative collective created a literal menagerie of animals climbing the double helix together. Aesthetically, they chose the finish and color of bones, the deepest region of where our genetic information is stored, that offers another layer of organic reference. These smallest elements of genetic information are reinterpreted as their own standalone apparatus, ossified and alive. In a companion video, we see them moving up the twisting ladder in a march up the backbone of earthly life.

    This kind of a project is no small feat. Each animal has to be ideated and executed separately to the behavior of that species, and each animal climbs in three dimensions as the camera moves around the spinning group. When National Geographic came to Bose Collins with this idea, they knew it wasn’t going to be easy but they had no idea how expertly Bose Collins would finish it. The Digital Creative Director of National Geographic, Emmet Smith, says, “Bose Collins took a good idea and sharpened it into a great one. They then topped that off with even better craft in execution. Unbeatable.”

    Check out the cover with a companion video, as well as a video that offers a behind the scenes look at Bose Collins' process.

  • 4.13.16

    Bose Collins Captures the Sea

    Time is a dimension that can never be exhausted. It has a beat to it, an ebb and flow that we count in seconds and minutes, and sometimes it feels more like a heartbeat. Sometimes it feels like the waves of time lap against the shores of our world. Like a bottomless sea, time is dark and mysterious, extending beyond the lives of us all. But still we measure it. Luxury watchmaker Ulysse Nardin dove into the connection of the sea and time for their latest collection of watches and asked Bose Collins to help create a campaign around the same idea. The entire concept of the spot focuses around the building and cresting of a wave that mirrors the rhythm of time. Once they agreed on a hero image of the dramatic wave, everything flowed through that. “We wanted a stylized vision of how we saw it,” Nathan Collins of Bose Collins says. “The colorization, the atmosphere, the mood. But also keeping to the reality, the story of waves and the motion of the sea is a real thing so we’re actually illustrating, but in a stylized way.”

    Creating an entire sea down to the detail is no small feat, but once Bose Collins agreed on a visual angle with Ulysse Nardin it came down to executing it. And it took a lot of work. “It was very much an experiment, and fortunately we have some very talented guys amongst us, so there was a head’s down stage while everyone was beavering away feverishly on a simulation of waves,” says Nathan. “It was a case of trial an error. A lot of hours of simulations and searching how other people had done things. It was quite a journey, but we’re really happy with how it turned out.” They matched the reality of the sea with the artistic flare of tone and momentum, creating the perfect synergy of reality and drama.

    “It was fun,” Nathan says. “It was actually a really organic process in a way.” Neither time nor the sea can ever truly be harnessed, but we can make feints at it in our own little ways, whether it’s measuring the immeasurable with a watch or grasping at the abyss with a stylized representation of pure, natural power.

  • 2.29.16

    Bose Collins Visualizes Technology for British Airways

    What does technology look like? 

    As a concept, technology is more than a bank of computers or bundles of cords. Technology is an idea, a way to understand this world of ours that is somewhere in the future, being pulled towards us by technicians, engineers, and creatives. It’s a construct that allows us to imagine that future and create a space for it. San Jose, California and London are two hotbeds of technological advancement, and because of the way we connect to one another today they can communicate almost instantaneously. But even with digital portals, sometimes the best way to work together is to be together.  British Airways is closing the gap between these two cities, offering a new gateway of travel with direct flights between them and asked Bose Collins to help them announce it.

    In a series of ads that bridge the gap between these two technological hubs, we see them come together in a beautiful tangle of tech tentacles, wrapping around each other in concert. Each ad is a deeper exploration of our expectations and understanding of technology and how it works for us, and if that weren’t enough they turned one into a gif in constant, undulating movement so tangible you can almost touch it.

    Because of Bose Collins’ mastery of CGI what we’re looking at is something that – without the right artists’ hands – could only exist in our imaginations. Just like the foresight that technological visionaries have, Bose Collins must pluck an entire world of invention and serve it to us within our own narrow context of understanding. They root these ideas in the metal wires and housings of imagination machines that look like the component parts of a future airplane. It is the results of their collaboration, the middle of the space they inhabit, and the overlap that British Airways is creating, where the magic happens. Creating a bridge for San Jose and London is laying the foundation for an incredible future of creative collaboration, and Bose Collins is whetting our appetite for the fruits of that new path.

  • 7.30.15

    Victoria Plum's Wonderous Bathroom by Bose Collins

    There are few places that offer the solitude of the bathroom. In an age where we’re constantly in contact with one another and always finding new ways to interact with our worlds, the bathroom offers a type of sanctuary that is unparalleled. With very few exceptions, it’s the one place where you can always count on being alone, and that is something that should be celebrated.

    For their latest advertisement spot, Victoria Plum was looking to create a visual representation of this celebration, showing off their fixtures and products. Bose Collins, the CGI company that Victoria Plum tapped for the advertisement, ideated with London based film company Alpha Century. Together they looked to Busby Berkeley for inspiration. You’re already familiar with Busby Berkeley, even if you didn’t know. Busby is best known for his films with intense choreography and synchronicity. “We wanted to have this element of Alice in Wonderland or the tunnel in Charlie in the Chocolate Factory,” explains Nathan Collins of Bose Collins. “We wanted it to be a bit of a ride.” Looking specifically to Berkeley choreography with swimmers, the video becomes a sort of sink and faucet kaleidoscopic hallucination. The clean lines and fresh feeling of Victoria Plum’s products are the perfect squeaky clean base for such an imaginative visualization.

    To achieve this look, Bose Collins had to manage a breathtaking amount of assets and imagery. The only way to do that successfully was to plan for everything. “We storyboarded it to a really, really high level,” says Nathan. “And when we shot it, we shot all the elements.” Operating two parallel sessions, every element seen on screen was photographed and filmed by the Bose Collins team to ensure they had everything they needed. Then through the challenging process of fitting everything together as smoothly as possible they were able to achieve this homage to classic Hollywood inspiration.

    When creating an entire alternate with all these elements they were shooting from real life, it was impossible for Bose Collins to know exactly what it was going to look like until they started piecing it together. That moment, when everything came together for the first time, was a remarkable event for the team at Bose Collins. When asked what the most satisfying moment of the production was, Nathan didn’t have to think very long: “Putting together the first edit of the live action shoot, the moment when we locked in with the music and got a sense of what it was going to be. It’s quite satisfying that we can bring this thing to life how we imagined it.”

  • 1.3.14

    Bose Collins Builds Steampunk Bird for HarperCollins

    Bose Collins created the jacket for a upcoming Alloy Entertainment book to be published by HarperCollins in September. (Stay tuned for the title and author!) "I approached Bose Collins after seeing the beautiful, mechanical parts in its portfolio," explained Liz Dresner, a designer at Alloy Entertainment. "I began with a comp depicting a hummingbird made from watch parts – that was the imagery I had on hand – and I asked them to move a bit away from that. They did a great job finding textures, and balancing the feathers and delicate elements with the metallic and more machinelike elements. The result is gorgeous."

    Nathan Collins called the feathers "the trickiest components. We started with the hummingbird's head and body using illuminated details to add a futuristic, robotic feeling, and the feathers were sort of filaments ... but it didn't look right. We wanted to maintain the same visual language so we added in cogs, arms, and structures that one wouldn't see in nature." The process – which included outlining and building the CGI animal, fine-tuning the colors, and post-producing in Photoshop – took about a month. The team set the bird against a stock cityscape.

    "We knew the cover would be magical as it was developing," Collins remarked. "Have you had the inkling, as you're working on something, that it will turn out to be special? We felt that the entire time."

  • 11.20.13

    Bose Collins Uses the Force for Nissan's Qashqai

    Bose Collins's short film for Nissan unveils the second generation Qashqai, the automaker's best-selling crossover vehicle. "We wanted to take an unusual approach and for the Nissan Terra, we moved a white light stick overhead to make it look like the Terra was driving through a car park," explained Nathan Collins. "We were fascinated with the effect, so when we were asked to shoot the Qashqai, we decided to go to town with the idea and do an entire shoot based on the technique." 

    The team of five, armed with a pair of orange light sticks, "waved them over the Qashqai (and out of camera) to create reflections and change the depth of field for the shots ... the light sticks look like lightsabers, so we appeared to be Jedis practicing their craft," Collins remarked. Because of timing constraints, the group didn't have time for much post-production work, meaning no CGI was involved. "We had to get it in camera, do an edit, and cut it to the music. We were shooting digital, so we could play back the footage as we went along." Bose Collins spent two days on set and captured the auto's interior sans light sticks, as well.

    Star Wars references aside, Collins also described the gig as "something out of a James Bond movie ... I've never seen anything similar to it security-wise. The reveal of the Qashqai's new shape was a big deal, so we had to hide everything. It was highly exciting. And it was actually the smoothest job we've ever done."

  • 11.20.13

    Bose Collins Uses the Force for Nissan's Qashqai

    Bose Collins's short film for Nissan unveils the second generation Qashqai, the automaker's best-selling crossover vehicle. "We wanted to take an unusual approach and for the Nissan Terra, we moved a white light stick overhead to make it look like the Terra was driving through a car park," explained Nathan Collins. "We were fascinated with the effect, so when we were asked to shoot the Qashqai, we decided to go to town with the idea and do an entire shoot based on the technique." 

    The team of five, armed with a pair of orange light sticks, "waved them over the Qashqai (and out of camera) to create reflections and change the depth of field for the shots ... the light sticks look like lightsabers, so we appeared to be Jedis practicing their craft," Collins remarked. Because of timing constraints, the group didn't have time for much post-production work, meaning no CGI was involved. "We had to get it in camera, do an edit, and cut it to the music. We were shooting digital, so we could play back the footage as we went along." Bose Collins spent two days on set and captured the auto's interior sans light sticks, as well.

    Star Wars references aside, Collins also described the gig as "something out of a James Bond movie ... I've never seen anything similar to it security-wise. The reveal of the Qashqai's new shape was a big deal, so we had to hide everything. It was highly exciting. And it was actually the smoothest job we've ever done."

  • 11.6.13

    Bose Collins Creates Its Own Brilliant Machines for GE

    Bose Collins created three posters for GE's Brilliant Machines campaign.

    "When we first heard about the project and what GE wanted, we knew it was a match made in heaven," remarked Nathan Collins. "It taps into things we've explored when left to our own devices, so it was entirely in our comfort zone ... heavy metal and robots are two of our favorite things." Likewise, BBDO thought Bose Collins "was a great fit because of its music-related work with a tech-looking, robot-feel to it," said Tessa Cosenza, account manager. "We are really happy with how the GE posters turned out."

    Using CGI, Collins and his team made a guitar, a drum set, and a robot's visage from bits of GE appliances. "Each object took days," Collins explained. "It's comparable to building one of those model airplanes as a kid – putting together the parts, painting those individually ... these models are constructed so the camera can be placed anywhere. The positioning in the posters is the angle the creatives wanted, but we could fly around these objects – in, out, and around."  

    The artwork, placed downtown and in Brooklyn, announces the next Brilliant Machines event – a free Compressorhead concert in Union Square on Tuesday, November 12. (The band "is comprised of three 5 foot tall humanoids: Stickboy on drums, Bones on bass, and Fingers as lead/rhythm," according to a press release.) For a preview of Compressorhead's oeuvre, passersby with headphones can plug into certain Bose Collin's posters ahead of the show.

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