• 1.17.17   Marco Grob Tells the Unfortunate Tale with Netflix

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    You may not want to read any further for what we are about to describe is an inspiring tale of creative collaboration but for the purpose of telling a very, very sad tale. The miserable story is, of course, A Series of Unfortunate Events, a new Netflix series that brings the unenviable yarn of the Baudelaire Children as told by Lemony Snicket to the smaller screen (or tablet, or smartphone, however you get your streaming media).  Netflix asked famed entertainment photographer, and frequent Netflix collaborator, Marco Grob, to help them visualize this most daringly morose of sagas. What they created together is a perfect construction of the decidedly wicked Count Olaf (played by Neil Patrick Harris) as he spies upon the poor Baudelaire trio from his obviously nefarious spyglass – the name for which we did not choose as a way to spoil any part of the show but you should know it was chosen quite purposefully. Not only does the image - created pixel by pixel thanks to Marco’s detailed work – encapsulate the ghastly state of affairs for the Baudelaires, it also reveals the production design that is rich with references, clues, and more than a happy life’s amount of shadows. We cannot in good conscience tell you to watch the show – "Look away! Look away!" proclaims the theme music. But if you must, it’s already streaming on Netflix. (At the very least, we beg you watch through your fingers.)
  • 1.17.17   Mark Hunter Invites You to the Party

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    Las Vegas is legendary. “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” they tell us, relieving us from the pressure of the repercussions of out choices. That’s why we spend so much money, dress up so fancy, and party so hard – none of it matters! But in recent years revelers have looked for something a little different, a little more casual, and for some, LAX Nightclub is exactly that. The new Las Vegas club teamed up with Mark Hunter on an introductory campaign that shows off exactly the vibe at the club – something that Mark knows very well.  “LAX nightclub and I have a history since my early party days,” Mark explains. The club started in LA by the late, legendary DJ AM and Mark has been going since forever. “We would throw these parties at his LAX nightclubs and they were perfect,” he says. This time LAX just wanted him to keep the party going, and keep the camera snapping. “We did a real life casting and all the models schlepped out on a party bus from LA, and went straight into the nightclub so they were ready and wild,” says Mark. “And then working within the actual club environment was so fun for me because that’s what I do.” No matter what he’s doing, Mark always tries to create an atmosphere on set that matches the energy of the final images perfectly. To get a party they threw a party at the actual club. Everything you see in the photos is actually happening, and very little is staged – and when you go to LAX you night might look exactly like what you’re seeing in the ads. The match up of LAX and Mark is more than aesthetic. What makes LAX different is what makes Mark different. “LAX is a club for everybody and you don’t have to get dressed up fancy. It’s not about bottle service, it’s not about paying a huge cover fee, it’s about coming and having fun,” says Mark. “That’s somewhere where I would prefer to go. I would never spend thousands of dollars on a nightclub table and try to impress my friends, that’s just not me and I know that there’s a lot of other people like me.” This is a place where everyone is welcome, and Mark’s work shows how welcoming and unassuming the place is. What happens in Vegas might stay in Vegas, but it doesn’t have to – you can remember it forever.
  • 1.12.17   Tom Corbett Gets Rockin' With Somerset

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    Most of the work that Tom Corbett has been creating with Somerset Collection has been an amazing journey across the globe, exploring different cities and aesthetics. But for a recent issue that examines the energy of the Rock ‘n’ Roll movement, Tom and the publication decided to take it into the studio and examine the energy in a white space. Rock ‘n’ Roll isn’t clean, it isn’t tidy or orderly, but Tom and Somerset wanted to see what they could find given such an unconventional set up. “We didn’t want it to look contrived or too lit and we wanted to do something really free and really Rock ‘n’ Roll. So we lit it as if we were outside,” Tom explains. “The whole premise was just to shoot, just to be absolutely free with it, not to think too much about it, and just go where it takes us.” Even though a clean white aesthetic might run counter to the way we think about Rock ‘n’ Roll, the way that Tom and Somerset set it up it actually did more to show that spirit than they could have achieved in a different way.  It’s all about energy. By creating a space that is “no where,” the models were free to spin their energy wherever they wanted, expressing themselves fully in front of the lens. “The whole idea so they could really run across the whole space and be totally free and not have to worry about where their marks are,” explains Tom. “It was a big lighting set-up, it was something I hadn’t done before and something I really enjoyed it.” By liberating the models from tight poses and tiny places to work, they were able to channel Rock ‘n’ Roll, dancing from one edge of the frame to the other, showing the movement of their clothes and injecting personality in every gesture. And sometimes that movement reached beyond the frame. Many of the photos in the story feature models that are cropped by the edge of the image, as if they’re entering or leaving the photographs on their way from one place to another. Tom didn’t exactly plan it that way, but is thrilled with that result. “I wanted it to feel totally caught, but I didn’t want it to feel contrived or thought out too much. It’s this totally free moment, they have the whole frame to play through and they were moving constantly and if I caught a half of them or a third of them or it was the whole thing then it was all good,” says Tom. “Part of the strength of the images come from the framing. They’re exploding out of the frame, the tight crops, the extreme angles. It bends those traditional rules. We’re trying to push the envelope a little bit.”
  • 1.6.17   Rizon Parein Embraces Chaos for Nike

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    We think of the apex of design as being clean, smooth, and brought down the most basic of elements. It’s all about editing, bringing a look clearer and clearer until it’s reached the most minimal reality it can be – and then it’s done. But when Rizon Parein was approached by Nike to help them create branding materials for Kyrie Irving’s third shoe with the brand they went in the opposite direction. His edict was to manipulate the word “CUT” in such a way that it reflected its own definition. And he went wild with it. “First I completely messed up the typography, the regular type. Like totally destroyed it,” says Rizon. “But it kind of lost its power and the message because the typography by itself was already really strong and it was working really well with the photo of Kyrie Irving, so it needed to be more subtle and we needed to tell the story more in a subtle way all over the place.” He left in as much of chaos as he could, while still allowing the message to come through. While working on this expressive project Rizon became a father. He already works on a short timeline, but the new life in his family made it even more exciting. “I made it just right before my son came to the planet,” he says. “The job went really fast and not more than 10 days everything was made and rendered and then the day the actual labor started there was still some feedback of making variations, but it went really fast.” They were able to get everything completed successfully while still spending time with his newly expanded family. Nike went on to use Rizon’s work in installations all over the world from Niketown locations in New York all the way to Asia. Normally, Rizon would travel around and experience them himself, but because of his new son he can’t. Luckily he gets to experience it online instead. “It’s funny, you search on Instagram #Kyrie3 or #CutOutOfNowhere and suddenly you see the stuff live in Asia and at NikeTown and it’s really fun to discover it that way,” Rizon says. “It’s always a nice surprise.” We’ve provided imagery from Rizon’s work, but if you check through social media with those tags you can see how it’s showing up in stores all over the world.
  • 1.11.17   Andrew Rae Gets Digital with Wacom

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    An artist is more than their tools, but a great tool can mean the difference between a perfectly executed idea and a lot of wasted time. As an illustrator, Andrew Rae “creates monsters,” dragging up all sorts of beings from inside his head and turning them into a drawn reality. The creative process means he literally creates everything from scratch which presents its own barrage of challenges. “As an illustrator you’re trying to create a visual language, I suppose, so everything is a simplified version of the real world,” says Andrew. “I’m trying to draw through the filter of my own brain as opposed to trying to replicate reality too much.” Historically he’s created these fun entities by drawing them on paper and loading them into his computer through a scanning process and then playing that way. But that can be a time-consuming process. Wacom, the interactive pen and tablet stylus company, teamed up with Andrew to help them launch their Intuos Pro tablet and created a video together that explores how technology can inform an artist’s process. There are a lot of tablets on the market but Andrew needs something portable, that can follow him where ever inspiration takes him. “The beautiful thing about this product, the fact that you can draw on a piece of paper so it feels really natural. It’s going to be really handy particularly at the sketch stage. It allows you to sit and sketch in a kind of comfortable position, in the kind of position that lets intuitive drawings come out,” explains Andrew. “Basically what I want is a piece of paper that runs Photoshop and this is getting pretty close to that.” To hear more about Andrew’s process and how Wacom helps him out, check the video below. And check out his in-process illustration that was used on the packaging for this awesome machine.
  • 1.4.17   Tom Nagy Finds All the 'Lost Animals'

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    This planet is covered with life. From the deepest depths to the highest peaks, whether we can see it or not there is life. From sharp-clawed bears roaming the arctic to tiny microbials in the searing waters of deep ocean vents, there’s life everywhere. As humans we’ve actively removed ourselves from the life cycle of the planet, building our own cities far away from the rest of life on Earth. It makes us forget who we share this planet with sometimes. But what if there was a way to remember? Tom Nagy was confronted with this idea once while flying high above Alaska and it inspired his ongoing series ‘Hidden Animals.’ “I was flying in a helicopter over Alaska and the landscape was incredible but I didn’t see any animals there,” he says. “Even with the sun shining and flying hundreds of kilometers, there were no animals. I was missing the animals, and I thought how would the animals look there?” His series explores this question by bringing animals into the human space and creating images that challenge our ideas of how the line between humanity and animal life is drawn. Tom is known for his broad and brightly saturated images created for clients like American Airlines, Exxon, and Infitini, but he wanted to make something entirely new for Lost Animals. A thematic break wasn’t enough, he wanted to have a more foundational change. So, he looked at color. “I chose black and white because I didn’t want it to feel that contemporary,” says Tom. “I wanted to give them a more timeless feel. I wanted to separate them clearly from my commercial work in a way, because there’s always the color, always the clean, creamy colors in my commercial work. This is much different.” We’re not going to give away how Tom makes the images happen – we don’t want the magic to be lost – but the locations he picks each have a unique purpose. For instance, the image in Rio with the zebras is a very popular spot in the city, and really does jut up against the wild jungle.  “Many people go there and it’s crazy because on the left-hand side you have the city, a very dense city, and on the right-hand side there is a really super wild jungle. It’s really there,” says Tom. “And when I was standing there I wondered how would it be if these zebras came across the border for a moment. This is that moment.” Those moments, and the potential for those moments, are all around us. Even when they’re not there, even when we don’t see them, we can imagine that they’re there. We can imagine that our relationship with nature has not been entirely lost, that it’s just beyond the scope of our vision. And these animals, lost or found, help us see what it is we can’t already see.
  • 1.5.17   Reed + Rader Get Down with Dinosaurs

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    If you’ve never Googled “Dubstep Dinosaurs” maybe your priorities are kind of out of whack. If you have Googled “Dubstep Dinosaurs” you’re not alone. A couple months ago someone at Sprout, a kid focused TV network owned by NBCUniversal, Googled that exact same phrase and found themselves confronted with the work of Reed + Rader. Pamela Reed and Matthew Rader have been working on their series of Dubstep Dinosaur videos since 2011 but this was the first time a major client stepped in and wanted a piece of it. Sprout asked Pamela and Matthew to use their original work as inspiration to help Sprout announce and celebrate a marathon of Land Before Time movies and the launch of a new TV show. “It worked perfect because all the costuming and the styling for all the Dubstep Dinosaurs in the past has always been very lighthearted and kid friendly, all the costumes are finger-painted and cardboard and very kind of a kindergarten type of aesthetic and that really fit perfectly with this idea of doing it for kids,” explains Matthew. Not only was this new work going to be directed at kids, but it was going to star some too.  Reed + Rader are masters of blending CGI and live action, and the Dubstep Dinosaur videos are usually a combination thereof, but for the pieces with Sprout it was entirely live action. That meant bringing in a handful of young kids for the expressed purpose of having them dance and bounce around. It was a lot of energy to stick into one room. “It was like seven kids and they’re six years old and they just want to run around on the white syke and do handstands and cartwheels,” says Pamela. “We jumped into set a lot to talk to the kids and explain to them what we wanted. And I looked over at Matthew once and he had three little boys just wrapped around his neck and it was like that kind of day.” Directing that many kids is not unlike herding cats, but Matthew and Pamela were able to get in there and make it work.  Not only did they make it work, they did it on an incredible timeline. In just eight days they were able to pull this whole thing together. That kind of expediency requires a lot of organization, scheduling, and preparation – all things that kids have zero reverence for. “Pamela and I are very planned so we usually get a little freaked out when things are left to chance,” explains Matthew. “From the very first take probably the thoughts going through our minds was that the kids were totally not going to do what we want, but then seeing what we came out with it ended up really great.” Reed + Rader did just the right amount of planning that they could throw caution to the wind and operate with the kids in a way that worked for them for the perfect results.
B&A Instafeed
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  • A quiet moment with @sasha_melnychuk captured by @benrayner for @glamourmag. Styling by Jamie Kay Waxman.⠀
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  • Ms @sasha_melnychuk is on the go with @benrayner for @glamourmag. Styling by Jamie Kay Waxman.⠀
#fashion #fashionable #love #style #beautiful #ootd #beautyall #photooftheday #photography
    likes 175 // comments 3
  • The rosey haired @sasha_melnychuk getting a laugh in with @benrayner for @glamourmag. Styling by Jamie Kay Waxman.⠀
#fashion #fashionable #love #style #beautiful #ootd #beautyall #photooftheday #photography
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  • The sun sets on another day with Tom Nagy.⠀
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