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Insa

Self Reflection Is Greater Than Self Projection

Craft

This installation piece is INSA’s most obviously paradoxical to date. Having built the INSA ‘brand’ through reiterating issues of the female body and commodity fetishism, here, amid a swirling cacophony of bikini clad women and chrome, the audience is assured that ‘Self Reflection is Greater than Self Projection’.

 - The work is a maelstrom of spheres reflecting a distorted and sexually exaggerated view of two women gesticulating amongst the chaos. Glimpses of a black and white striped background behind these spheres hint at, albeit briefly, some sort of superseded purity as the irrepressible foreground pushes its way back into focus. To produce the work, INSA constructed an 8ft x 8ft box, painted the interior with disorientating stripes with one wall made of reflective chrome spheres. With the cameras and flashes set to record remotely, INSA actively removed himself from participating in this process. In pitch black, and with the camera only recording the deceptive reflections with each flash cycle, the photographer and the girls were equally distant from the end results. Thus, the final imagery’s depiction of make-believe is further deepened and the artist is no more engaged with the fantasy/ reality than the viewer.

The work is a maelstrom of spheres reflecting a distorted and sexually exaggerated view of two women gesticulating amongst the chaos. Glimpses of a black and white striped background behind these spheres hint at, albeit briefly, some sort of superseded purity as the irrepressible foreground pushes its way back into focus. To produce the work, INSA constructed an 8ft x 8ft box, painted the interior with disorientating stripes with one wall made of reflective chrome spheres. With the cameras and flashes set to record remotely, INSA actively removed himself from participating in this process. In pitch black, and with the camera only recording the deceptive reflections with each flash cycle, the photographer and the girls were equally distant from the end results. Thus, the final imagery’s depiction of make-believe is further deepened and the artist is no more engaged with the fantasy/ reality than the viewer.

 - The optical illusion created by the digitally printed vinyl melds the walls into each other to encircle the viewer in this disarming reality. Alluring and grotesque in equal parts; INSA’s work once again challenges our notions of attainment and success, questioning a culture obsessed with image and money and our own culpability and complicity in it. Even if we want no part in it, can we ever avoid being voyeurs of these two girls and the INSA bubble they inhabit?

The optical illusion created by the digitally printed vinyl melds the walls into each other to encircle the viewer in this disarming reality. Alluring and grotesque in equal parts; INSA’s work once again challenges our notions of attainment and success, questioning a culture obsessed with image and money and our own culpability and complicity in it. Even if we want no part in it, can we ever avoid being voyeurs of these two girls and the INSA bubble they inhabit?

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