• 5.26.15

    Tiny Atlas Quarterly Gets Down to Earth

    The endless white expanse of White Sands is actually gypsum, a stone that is a main component of chalk. The crystals are crunchy and course, and bounce light like a soft mirror – any photographer’s dream. When Emily Nathan took a shoot out to White Sands for the latest issue of Tiny Atlas Quarterly, it was almost like checking a line off a bucket list; it was somewhere she’d been wanting to visit for a long time. “It’s an amazing, amazing place,” Emily gushes. “I’ve been to a lot of places, like so many places. And I don’t usually want to take selfies or sort of freak out about a place. But White Sands is just stunning. For photographers it’s like kryptonite.” But she did take selfies, and photographs of her real life photographer friends, Sera Lindsay and Philip Eastman, wearing Teva’s latest footwear. “I had to keep taking pictures. I took pictures from the car, every moment. It’s just spectacular. It’s so beautiful,” she says

    To bring this shoot into focus for Tiny Atlas, Emily conscripted a miniature team of artists for their signature flair. “There’s just all these layers like a typical Tiny Atlas story. We worked with graphic designer Lauren Crosier on the typography and Heather Day who’s a painter,” she says. She chose Heather’s work specifically for the aesthetic interpretation that it would bring to the story. Inherent in the name of the publication is that it is about travel, and spaces, and how people interact with those spaces. How the world can become an atlas, a map, as we find our way through from one place to the next. Heather’s work was pitch perfect for Emily to combine with her photography. “A lot of [Heather’s] paintings have a sort of mapping sentiment to them that are abstract. We simplified her work to fit the imagery,” says Emily

    When pairing with a brand like Teva for her own publication, the most important element is integrity. The pairing has to make sense, and for Emily, the relationship with Teva made sense because Teva understands what Tiny Atlas is all about. When they came to Tiny Atlas, they wanted to stay true to the vision of the publication. “We worked with Teva from the beginning, and they really looked to Tiny Atlas to do our thing which was cool. They wanted us to find locations that were inspiring for us, that worked for our content, and then they wanted real people for models,” she says. So that’s what they did. Armed with cameras, friends, and the gypsum crystals of White Sands, they stepped into this otherworldly setting and found another pin to sink into their atlas.

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