• 6.11.15

    Sam Robinson's British Invasion

    The tradition of Savile Row dates back to the mid 1800s, and represents a mere three blocks of Central London. Suit makers have been honing their craft for more than a century on this small street, each shop besting one another (or at least trying to) as each season and round of trends comes up for its time. It is an incredibly British tradition with no true parallel, but is renowned the world over and the basis of inspiration for countless designers. Included in that list are the minds behind Saville Row (notice the additional L), a Chilean brand built with the same hunger for quality and distinction. To highlight their brand’s provenance and inspiration they tapped British photographer Sam Robinson whose style lined up precisely with what they wanted for their presentation.

    Sam is known for lifestyle shoots that are composed but graceful. They are accessible and relaxed, which may not seem like the immediate choice for a brand that makes suits and dresses. But it was exactly what they needed to bring the brand into the strata of the contemporary professional. “The idea was to try to make that very high-end world and a bit more approachable,” Sam explains. “We have this thing in England about making things quite pompous and unattainable. We wanted to make the brand feel attainable even though it has an essence and quality and strength and history to it.” By straddling his style and the essence of the brand these very high-end looks end up being personable and comprehensible, making high fashion wearable every day.

    For Sam, it was a particularly pleasurable challenge because he got to express parts of his hometown culture that normally get downplayed. When Saville Row came to him they requested a very British feel. Even though the brand isn’t based in the UK, the tradition and techniques come from that study and they wanted to pay homage to their history. There is so much more to British culture than a collection of royals and jokes about tea, and Sam was honored to explore it. “Something that was really nice about this project was being able to be British and actually be quite British,” says Sam. “It’s quite often something that we hold back from. There was something about being able to be British without flaunting it, without it being royal or regal or too obnoxious, but just be proud.” Tartan fabrics, the rich architecture of Wrotham Park, along with the employ of a vintage Morgan Car made for an atmosphere that’s undeniably British, fully embracing Sam’s culture, and completely relatable. It’s patriotic, proud, and effortlessly beautiful.

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