• 10.16.14

    Found Adds a New Dimension to Growing Up

    Growing up is more than scraped knees and first loves. Growing up is closer and bolder, gentler than juvenile foibles and early stumbles. Growing up happens on the other side of childhood, when the score starts to count. For Hiscox latest campaign, “The House I Grew Up In,” the insurance company wanted to show off the lessons and responsibilities of adulthood in a way that was surprising and compelling, while remaining personally affecting. They chose Found to create an immersive experience that could translate seamlessly into a filmed advertisement. Found spent three months working on an expressively detailed projection mapping motion project that played on a real house in a residential neighborhood.

    As one can see from their provided Behind the Scenes video, each element in the projection mapping was carefully conceived and animated separately with care tantamount to them each being the subject of the entire project. It was the first time they had worked on projection mapping that was this detailed. “Compared to the stuff we do on big buildings where we kind of go really bold and almost shock, there was a lot more emotion in what we were doing with this,” explains Ian Walker, Producer at Found. “We had to be a lot more intricate with the design and put a lot more detail and more thought in what people were going to feel from it, because it was a completely different purpose from our live projections.” Since the piece was filmed to be played over and over, Found had to make sure that every element came out flawlessly. They didn’t have the forgiveness of a one-time audience.

    There was a little bit of an audience, in addition to the camera. “We had to do it over and over and over again to make sure we got all the elements and make sure it was right,” explains Ian. “Which meant we were making noise in the night on a residential street during the middle of the week. But everyone seemed pretty happy and they didn’t really complain. It was a logistical challenge.” The logistics, in addition to the many elements in the piece, disappear into it. Since the entire motion element was projected on to a static flat surface, but the camera was moving, there had to be a dynamic presentation of space to keep it looking like it was in the third dimension. As the camera moved the background and foreground had to move at different speeds to create the illusion of the third dimension and sell the effects. “It only looked right from the camera’s point of view,” Ian explains. “That was a massive challenge, getting all those elements to work together. It was such a complex thing.” But it was worth it.

    “We could have done this with digital visual effects,” Ian says. But there would have been something missing. “There’s a certain integrity and loveliness to actually doing it for real, and I think people probably will sort of connect with that. We wanted to do something that people really connected with and I think you get that with doing stuff for real and not faking it.”

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