• 8.22.17

    Bewilder Opens the Potential of Facebook

    Social media connects us. It brings users together from all over the world and acts as a meeting place for anyone who logs on to interact. It started with status updates and sharing photos, but has become the most powerful tool in the world, offering captive audiences for brands and forums to gauge, change, or witness massive social movements. Facebook is the new meeting house, Instagram is the new museum. And all of them can be the perfect platform on which to launch your next business. Facebook just teamed up with Bewilder to show off their Creative Shop that helps businesses tell their stories on the social media platform. In a series of three videos Ruan Vermeulen and his team focused on three different messages that every business needs to know and understand to activate their base on Facebook in the best and most effective ways.

    The three messages from the three videos are each unique, but each shows the power of the platform. The first video, “Spark Client Relationships,” portrays two kernels of popcorn pop from their vigorous handshaking, showing that they each become better through their relationships. Plus much more delicious. Your business can meet new clients through Facebook, engaging new members of a community and showing off your skills.

    In Bewilder’s “Be The Hero” animation, a lollipop gets a call and transforms into a caped defender. As a social media platform, Facebook offers users a space to offer complaints or grievances. Access to that allows for quick witted businesses to create solves.

    Finally, the “Shake Up Ideas” spot shows dozens of bottles of soda dancing along to a new groove and finally exploding with ecstasy. Since social media is so fast, it’s offers the perfect opportunity to test new ideas and strategies and see how they work before making them bigger messages. It can help the risk averse and the creatively willing.

    What do you need in your business? Bewilder shows that maybe the way you approach Social Media can help.

  • 6.20.17

    Bewilder Gets Good for PepsiCo

    Sometimes the best way to change the world is to start with yourself. We change the world not through huge actions, saving it all at once, but instead change is built tiny brick by tiny brick, each one created by our daily choices. To make the world cleaner: clean up after yourself. To make the world happier: make yourself happy first. To make the world healthier: make healthier choices for you and your family. That's what PepsiCo's Hello Goodness initiative enables: it makes the world a healthier place by offering better alternatives to the peckish and the thirsty. They put out more healthful products to choose over options that are not as good for you. PepsiCo asked Bewilder to help introduce their massive initiative to an audience who may be unfamiliar. “We wanted the piece to feel contemporary and fresh,” explains Ruan Vermeulen, Animation Director at Bewilder. The result is a broad video that follows a cast of characters while they incorporate better choices into their lives.

    What's remarkable about the Hello Goodness spot by Bewilder is that it doesn’t rely on an overarching narrative or voiceover to force any one particular story onto whoever is watching the video. Instead the broader story invites viewers to place themselves inside the stories and see themselves in the situations that Ruan and his team present. “The strong graphic and modular design language, combined with bright colors really helped to stitch the piece together,” explains Ruan. “We were able to blend graphic shapes into environments, thus creating smooth panning transition. The architectural environments, and the linear movement through them gave us the opportunity to let the camera tell most of the story, instead of character performance.” Maybe you need a break from your desk in the middle of the work day. Maybe you need to replenish after a work out. Maybe you want a picnic with family or friends. No matter what you're doing there's a better choice for you, and Bewilder shows all of these situations (and more) and how they can be seamlessly improved with more healthful choices.

    It’s easy for us to put ourselves in place of the characters that Bewilder created, even though the characters are so stylized. They have a unique look to them, and one that was created with incredible detail and attention to communication. “The character design were very much influence by the already established CI for Hello Goodness,” says Ruan. “Bold, graphic and simple shapes, with thinner lines to connect various elements. We intended on creating very generic characters, so that their design could easily be interchangeable to create more diverse characters. The thinner lines were very effective in creating facial expressions, and adding detail to characters where needed.” By making their characters these shapes they were able to represent the audience and tell a more effective story for everyone.

  • 6.20.17

    Bewilder Gets Good for PepsiCo

    Sometimes the best way to change the world is to start with yourself. We change the world not through huge actions, saving it all at once, but instead change is built tiny brick by tiny brick, each one created by our daily choices. To make the world cleaner: clean up after yourself. To make the world happier: make yourself happy first. To make the world healthier: make healthier choices for you and your family. That's what PepsiCo's Hello Goodness initiative enables: it makes the world a healthier place by offering better alternatives to the peckish and the thirsty. They put out more healthful products to choose over options that are not as good for you. PepsiCo asked Bewilder to help introduce their massive initiative to an audience who may be unfamiliar. “We wanted the piece to feel contemporary and fresh,” explains Ruan Vermeulen, Animation Director at Bewilder. The result is a broad video that follows a cast of characters while they incorporate better choices into their lives.

    What's remarkable about the Hello Goodness spot by Bewilder is that it doesn’t rely on an overarching narrative or voiceover to force any one particular story onto whoever is watching the video. Instead the broader story invites viewers to place themselves inside the stories and see themselves in the situations that Ruan and his team present. “The strong graphic and modular design language, combined with bright colors really helped to stitch the piece together,” explains Ruan. “We were able to blend graphic shapes into environments, thus creating smooth panning transition. The architectural environments, and the linear movement through them gave us the opportunity to let the camera tell most of the story, instead of character performance.” Maybe you need a break from your desk in the middle of the work day. Maybe you need to replenish after a work out. Maybe you want a picnic with family or friends. No matter what you're doing there's a better choice for you, and Bewilder shows all of these situations (and more) and how they can be seamlessly improved with more healthful choices.

    It’s easy for us to put ourselves in place of the characters that Bewilder created, even though the characters are so stylized. They have a unique look to them, and one that was created with incredible detail and attention to communication. “The character design were very much influence by the already established CI for Hello Goodness,” says Ruan. “Bold, graphic and simple shapes, with thinner lines to connect various elements. We intended on creating very generic characters, so that their design could easily be interchangeable to create more diverse characters. The thinner lines were very effective in creating facial expressions, and adding detail to characters where needed.” By making their characters these shapes they were able to represent the audience and tell a more effective story for everyone.

  • 10.31.16

    Bewilder Teaches Us our ABCs

    We think of the letter Z as an ending. And in many ways it is. It’s the last letter of our alphabet, but in reality we don’t know who put the letters in their order or why! So why does it have to be an ending? In fact, it’s the perfect opportunity for a beginning, to look back at everything that brought us to the “end” and place everything in a new context. For their newest phone, the Z, Motorola asked Bewilder to bring new life to the alphabet and effectively teach us our ABCs in a new way. They teamed up with more than a dozen artists from the B&A roster and the results are moving… Literally.

    Motorola asked the artists to help them think of different and clever uses for the phone. Some ideas illustrated by Buff Monster, Jeremyville, ilovedust, Shotopop, Jeff Soto, Andrew Bannecker, Serge Seidlitz, Radio, Peter Grundy, Stephen Bliss, Ceyln, Mcbess, Will Barras, Stanley Chow, Radio, and New York based artist Matthew Palizay, include projecting a movie on the inside of a whale, being the perfect dinosaur dance partners, or a dynamic space for game play. Each of these artists were given the space to create what they felt compelled to create, and then Bewilder took all of them into their creative home and brought them into motion.

    Each tiny film, replete with full sound design and edge-to-edge animation, was created to loop so it makes a GIF as successfully as it does a video. It can be a challenge to keep an eye on the integrity of the story of the piece while making sure that it loops, but Bewilder made it easy. "Bewilder nailed it," Palizay says. "The choices they made in animating the illustration brought it to a level beyond what I expected."

  • 10.31.16

    Bewilder Teaches Us our ABCs

    We think of the letter Z as an ending. And in many ways it is. It’s the last letter of our alphabet, but in reality we don’t know who put the letters in their order or why! So why does it have to be an ending? In fact, it’s the perfect opportunity for a beginning, to look back at everything that brought us to the “end” and place everything in a new context. For their newest phone, the Z, Motorola asked Bewilder to bring new life to the alphabet and effectively teach us our ABCs in a new way. They teamed up with more than a dozen artists from the B&A roster and the results are moving… Literally.

    Motorola asked the artists to help them think of different and clever uses for the phone. Some ideas illustrated by Buff Monster, Jeremyville, ilovedust, Shotopop, Jeff Soto, Andrew Bannecker, Serge Seidlitz, Radio, Peter Grundy, Stephen Bliss, Ceyln, Mcbess, Will Barras, Stanley Chow, Radio, and New York based artist Matthew Palizay, include projecting a movie on the inside of a whale, being the perfect dinosaur dance partners, or a dynamic space for game play. Each of these artists were given the space to create what they felt compelled to create, and then Bewilder took all of them into their creative home and brought them into motion.

    Each tiny film, replete with full sound design and edge-to-edge animation, was created to loop so it makes a GIF as successfully as it does a video. It can be a challenge to keep an eye on the integrity of the story of the piece while making sure that it loops, but Bewilder made it easy. "Bewilder nailed it," Palizay says. "The choices they made in animating the illustration brought it to a level beyond what I expected."

  • 12.7.15

    Am I Collective and GWK Pay Farmers the Respect they Deserve

    At the very top of the list “Things We Don’t Need to Tell You” is: Everybody Needs to Eat. Food and nutrition are such a foundational part of our lives that many don’t give it a second thought. It’s easy to go through our days walking down to the corner for a fully formed meal, or picking up a handful of extraordinarily fresh produce that was impossible to get even 50 years ago. We owe all of this to our farmers. Advances in farming technology, like those offered by agricultural company GWK, mean that we have unprecedented access to wonderful food that allows us to get on with our lives and touch the world in our own unique ways. GWK wanted to pay homage to the farmers they work with so they got in touch with Lowe and Partners and Am I Collective to figure out the best way to do it.

    Lowe and partners banged out a script that paid respect to GWK’s partners and sent it over to Am I Collective to think about execution. “When we first got the script from the agency we decided not to approach this as a traditional treatment but look at the story as an amazing opportunity to do something unique, something inspiring, and something that the South African audience hasn’t seen before,” says Ruan Vermeulen, the Animation Director at Am I Collective. There were a dozen ways they could have executed the project, but they decided to go for the gold: stop-frame animation.

    For the uninitiated: stop-frame animation is when the artists create 3D models and move them each little by little, taking a still photograph at each movement to create a single frame in the final piece. This kind of work is intense and time consuming, often requiring an entire day to get less than a ten seconds of animated material. But the hands on feature of stop-frame animation is exactly what Am I Collective felt like the story needed. “We decided to do a combination of stop-frame and CGI animation purely because stop-frame animation has an emotional and human side to it,” explains Ruan. “What’s amazing about stop-frame is that even though you’re using the fanciest equipment around it still needs the human hand. The same with farming. Even though farming is using the best equipment out there it still needs the farmer’s involvement, his hand, to make it work.”

    This process is a huge undertaking that comes with it some risk, but it was a commitment Am I Collective felt was worth it. “This was a really ambitious project and the technical and logistical challenges that we faced were inevitable,” says Vanessa McGowan. “This process requires a huge amount of focus. The smallest camera shake or lighting change can really throw off an entire day.” The resulting video is sweeping and epic, emotional and personal, and made successful by the direct interaction of artists and their mediums.

    Check out the whole video below, as well as a Behind the Scenes feature to understand the process a little better.

  • 12.7.15

    Am I Collective and GWK Pay Farmers the Respect they Deserve

    At the very top of the list “Things We Don’t Need to Tell You” is: Everybody Needs to Eat. Food and nutrition are such a foundational part of our lives that many don’t give it a second thought. It’s easy to go through our days walking down to the corner for a fully formed meal, or picking up a handful of extraordinarily fresh produce that was impossible to get even 50 years ago. We owe all of this to our farmers. Advances in farming technology, like those offered by agricultural company GWK, mean that we have unprecedented access to wonderful food that allows us to get on with our lives and touch the world in our own unique ways. GWK wanted to pay homage to the farmers they work with so they got in touch with Lowe and Partners and Am I Collective to figure out the best way to do it.

    Lowe and partners banged out a script that paid respect to GWK’s partners and sent it over to Am I Collective to think about execution. “When we first got the script from the agency we decided not to approach this as a traditional treatment but look at the story as an amazing opportunity to do something unique, something inspiring, and something that the South African audience hasn’t seen before,” says Ruan Vermeulen, the Animation Director at Am I Collective. There were a dozen ways they could have executed the project, but they decided to go for the gold: stop-frame animation.

    For the uninitiated: stop-frame animation is when the artists create 3D models and move them each little by little, taking a still photograph at each movement to create a single frame in the final piece. This kind of work is intense and time consuming, often requiring an entire day to get less than a ten seconds of animated material. But the hands on feature of stop-frame animation is exactly what Am I Collective felt like the story needed. “We decided to do a combination of stop-frame and CGI animation purely because stop-frame animation has an emotional and human side to it,” explains Ruan. “What’s amazing about stop-frame is that even though you’re using the fanciest equipment around it still needs the human hand. The same with farming. Even though farming is using the best equipment out there it still needs the farmer’s involvement, his hand, to make it work.”

    This process is a huge undertaking that comes with it some risk, but it was a commitment Am I Collective felt was worth it. “This was a really ambitious project and the technical and logistical challenges that we faced were inevitable,” says Vanessa McGowan. “This process requires a huge amount of focus. The smallest camera shake or lighting change can really throw off an entire day.” The resulting video is sweeping and epic, emotional and personal, and made successful by the direct interaction of artists and their mediums.

    Check out the whole video below, as well as a Behind the Scenes feature to understand the process a little better.

  • 10.22.15

    Am I Collective Brings Google Photos Together

    Our digital age offers us the ability to interact with one another in an instant. Social media brings people together in unprecedented ways, forming relationships across time and the globe, bringing together people of similar minds and passions. With the millions of users all over the world, the question isn’t if anyone shares your interests, the challenge is finding them. Google Photos’ new Live Search connects you with people who are talking about the same things, have the same interests, and are rooting for the same teams. Integrating a search function into a visual network synthesizes two distinctly different forms of communication, allowing our technology to work better for us. Google teamed up with Am I Collective on a record breaking speedy creation for an animated video that brings Live Search to life.

    Over the course of 16 seconds we get a visualization of how Live Search can be optimized into the user’s life. Merely searching a fan’s team colors brings up those images within the context of what people are talking about. And when it’s game day: they’re talking about the game. In this video, calling up “Blue” or “Yellow” on game day pulls up jerseys, each folding into digital paper that come together to make Google Photos’ logo which then transforms itself into a football and is flicked away.

    Am I Collective got the assignment and set to work immediately, wrapping up animation in half a day. We don’t need to tell you that is an incredibly protracted time frame. Google went on to use the video on their own social media platforms synthesizing form and function in a fun and exciting execution.

  • 10.22.15

    Am I Collective Brings Google Photos Together

    Our digital age offers us the ability to interact with one another in an instant. Social media brings people together in unprecedented ways, forming relationships across time and the globe, bringing together people of similar minds and passions. With the millions of users all over the world, the question isn’t if anyone shares your interests, the challenge is finding them. Google Photos’ new Live Search connects you with people who are talking about the same things, have the same interests, and are rooting for the same teams. Integrating a search function into a visual network synthesizes two distinctly different forms of communication, allowing our technology to work better for us. Google teamed up with Am I Collective on a record breaking speedy creation for an animated video that brings Live Search to life.

    Over the course of 16 seconds we get a visualization of how Live Search can be optimized into the user’s life. Merely searching a fan’s team colors brings up those images within the context of what people are talking about. And when it’s game day: they’re talking about the game. In this video, calling up “Blue” or “Yellow” on game day pulls up jerseys, each folding into digital paper that come together to make Google Photos’ logo which then transforms itself into a football and is flicked away.

    Am I Collective got the assignment and set to work immediately, wrapping up animation in half a day. We don’t need to tell you that is an incredibly protracted time frame. Google went on to use the video on their own social media platforms synthesizing form and function in a fun and exciting execution.

  • 11.17.14

    Am I Collective Takes the Time to Make It Right

    The first documented usage of stop motion animation was in 1902. It was created as a way to simulate an impossible live action filmed experience in the third dimension before more sophisticated effects were available. At the beginning it was crude and limited, but as the form developed it turned into it's own art form. Now that computers are capable of animating anything we can imagine, stop motion is entirely elective. We choose it for the way it looks and feels rather than out of necessity. It is created from practical elements shaped in real life, so textures and three-dimensional depth of field are far above what computers can generate, even today. It is an affirmative choice made out of love for the form, and the affinity for authenticity. Am I Collective took advantage of that inherent connection for their spots for Budget Insurance.

    Stop motion is a demanding form, moving the subject nearly imperceptible distances for a single frame, each frame captured separately as a photograph. Since 24 frames equates to only one second of final footage, means it can take an entire day to create just a few moments, especially when the movements are as complex as the choreography for the Budget videos. Am I Collective dug deep into this process, as is verifiable through their Behind the Scenes video. In it you can see Am I Collective designed every pose, mouth movement, and color far before animation began. Since stop motion is so time consuming, a very specific preproduction plan is crucial for successful execution, and to ensure no moments are wasted. Unlike live action filming where take after take can be captured, the time demands that each shot of stop motion is perfect. It’s exhaustive and exhausting, but the results are equal to the effort.

    Ultimately Am I Collective used a combination of practical stop motion and computer digital effects for the final spot. This combination allowed them to focus on the subjects of their stories. The human figures and their movements were entirely animated, while the backgrounds were filled in during post. But that’s how the spots ended up telling the story they needed to tell. The texture of the characters provided an element of humanity that would be flattened out using pure computer effects (without a lot of time and extra money). The practical elements ensure an immediate emotional connection to that which exists in the same world, and helps Budget Insurance make their pitch in a much more personal way.

  • 11.17.14

    Am I Collective Takes the Time to Make It Right

    The first documented usage of stop motion animation was in 1902. It was created as a way to simulate an impossible live action filmed experience in the third dimension before more sophisticated effects were available. At the beginning it was crude and limited, but as the form developed it turned into it's own art form. Now that computers are capable of animating anything we can imagine, stop motion is entirely elective. We choose it for the way it looks and feels rather than out of necessity. It is created from practical elements shaped in real life, so textures and three-dimensional depth of field are far above what computers can generate, even today. It is an affirmative choice made out of love for the form, and the affinity for authenticity. Am I Collective took advantage of that inherent connection for their spots for Budget Insurance.

    Stop motion is a demanding form, moving the subject nearly imperceptible distances for a single frame, each frame captured separately as a photograph. Since 24 frames equates to only one second of final footage, means it can take an entire day to create just a few moments, especially when the movements are as complex as the choreography for the Budget videos. Am I Collective dug deep into this process, as is verifiable through their Behind the Scenes video. In it you can see Am I Collective designed every pose, mouth movement, and color far before animation began. Since stop motion is so time consuming, a very specific preproduction plan is crucial for successful execution, and to ensure no moments are wasted. Unlike live action filming where take after take can be captured, the time demands that each shot of stop motion is perfect. It’s exhaustive and exhausting, but the results are equal to the effort.

    Ultimately Am I Collective used a combination of practical stop motion and computer digital effects for the final spot. This combination allowed them to focus on the subjects of their stories. The human figures and their movements were entirely animated, while the backgrounds were filled in during post. But that’s how the spots ended up telling the story they needed to tell. The texture of the characters provided an element of humanity that would be flattened out using pure computer effects (without a lot of time and extra money). The practical elements ensure an immediate emotional connection to that which exists in the same world, and helps Budget Insurance make their pitch in a much more personal way.

  • 9.9.13

    Am I Collective Charts the History of the Wallet for MTN

    Am I Collective and MetropolitanRepublic partnered on a TV commercial for MTN, a multinational mobile telecommunications company based in South Africa. The spot traces the evolution of the wallet from a pouch and string in 1692 to its present day purse-size proportions. "But here's the thing," the narrator notes, "now that your SIM card can replace all other cards, you can put the wallet into the mobile phone, where you can keep more cash, cards, and contacts than the humble wallet ever could."

    Director Ruan Vermeulen described AIC's process: "We start off by putting our concept into a story board and we reference different animation techniques to explain what we want to happen in each frame and how the object could possibly move ... once the animation portion starts, we work with all of the animators under one roof to ensure all aspects of the project get the attention they need. It also helps to be in constant communication will every single animator ... every member of the team feels part of the project from the beginning to the end."

    AIC used a combination of live action, stop-frame, and 3D animation to create a seamless journey. "What we love about the commercial is that it involved all elements from the Am I stable: directing, design, illustration, and a lot of problem-solving," assistant producer Chantal de Kock said, revealing another ad for MTN is in the pipeline. 

    Credits:
    Client: MTN Corporate
    Production Company: Am I Collective Cape Town
    Director: Ruan Vermeulen
    Producer: Arnelle Woker
    Assistant producer: Chantal de Kock
    Managing director: Mark van Niekerk
    Animation: Killer Robot VFX
    Props: SBB Fabrication
    Stop-frame supervisor: Lindsay van Blerk at XYZOO
    Stop-frame camera rigger/operator: Heiko Von Fintel at EYE ON LOCATION 
    Production: IKRAAL

  • 9.9.13

    Am I Collective Charts the History of the Wallet for MTN

    Am I Collective and MetropolitanRepublic partnered on a TV commercial for MTN, a multinational mobile telecommunications company based in South Africa. The spot traces the evolution of the wallet from a pouch and string in 1692 to its present day purse-size proportions. "But here's the thing," the narrator notes, "now that your SIM card can replace all other cards, you can put the wallet into the mobile phone, where you can keep more cash, cards, and contacts than the humble wallet ever could."

    Director Ruan Vermeulen described AIC's process: "We start off by putting our concept into a story board and we reference different animation techniques to explain what we want to happen in each frame and how the object could possibly move ... once the animation portion starts, we work with all of the animators under one roof to ensure all aspects of the project get the attention they need. It also helps to be in constant communication will every single animator ... every member of the team feels part of the project from the beginning to the end."

    AIC used a combination of live action, stop-frame, and 3D animation to create a seamless journey. "What we love about the commercial is that it involved all elements from the Am I stable: directing, design, illustration, and a lot of problem-solving," assistant producer Chantal de Kock said, revealing another ad for MTN is in the pipeline. 

    Credits:
    Client: MTN Corporate
    Production Company: Am I Collective Cape Town
    Director: Ruan Vermeulen
    Producer: Arnelle Woker
    Assistant producer: Chantal de Kock
    Managing director: Mark van Niekerk
    Animation: Killer Robot VFX
    Props: SBB Fabrication
    Stop-frame supervisor: Lindsay van Blerk at XYZOO
    Stop-frame camera rigger/operator: Heiko Von Fintel at EYE ON LOCATION 
    Production: IKRAAL

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